Blog Posts tagged: Poetry in the Classroom

Painting by Sir James Guthrie - the Gypsy Fires are Burning for Daylight Past and Gone

Inspiring poetry through art in the secondary classroom

Using images as a stimulus for writing can often unlock pupils' creativity, as English teacher Gordon Fisher found when he introduced pupils to a painting by Sir James Guthrie. In this blog post Gordon shares the approach he took to get pupils writing poetry inspired by the painting. Gordon has also made some of the pupils' work available for download, as well as some of the worksheets and presentations he created during the project.

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One of the 'sweets' created by the pupils, with a tag saying 'Peppermint Planets'

Writing Sweetie-Themed Poems at Comely Park Primary

Primary 6 pupils at Comely Park recently enjoyed a visit from poet Julie Douglas. Find out how Julie got the pupils writing some alliterative, sweetie-themed poetry in this blog post from the pupils.

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Image of crowds at Black Friday sale by John Henderson on Flickr - resized and cropped

Using Radiohead Lyrics to Discuss Consumerism in Class

Consumerism, advertising and their effect on mental health is something we really need to talk about with teenagers. In this blog post, find out how some Radiohed lyrics and a short story called 'Jumper' by Garrett Adams can be used as a springboard for some highly worthwhile discussions.

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Jenny Lindsay speaking to pupils at an authors live event - image by Alan Peebles

6 More Brilliant Poetry Performances on YouTube for Teens

If you're looking for some powerful and thought provoking poetry to show teens, we've compiled some of our favourite performances from YouTube in one handy location.

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Poet Miko Berry performing at an Authors Live event

Our Top Five Poetry Resources

Ahead of National Poetry Day, here are some fantastic resources to help you in the classroom or library. Whether you're looking to celebrate more traditional forms of verse or explore some innovative practice to change your pupils' perceptions of poetry, there's something here for you.

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Pupils taking part in slam poetry in a classroom

4 reasons to get your pupils doing slam poetry

Slam poetry can change your pupils' perception of what poetry is and who it's for. Introducing your pupils to the work of slam poets will really open their eyes, and getting them to compose and perform their own slam poems can have far-reaching benefits. Read this post to find out what those benefits are, and to find out about some great Scottish Book Trust resources on slam poetry.

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The Writing Light Shines Bright: Kemnay Academy's Poetry Slam Project

As part of our Schools Champions project Jennifer Horan, Network Librarian at Kemnay Academy in Aberdeenshire, used Jackie Kay's Authors Live broadcast as inspiration for a poetry writing project which culminated in a school poetry slam during Book Week Scotland. Read on to find out how Jennifer and her group of young writers got on!

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Image of a laptop and iPad by Luis Llerena on Stocksnap

7 Brilliant YouTube Channels for Teachers and Librarians

From performance poetry to wonders of the natural world, these channels will furnish you with plenty of content to inspire your pupils.

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Children enjoying an author event

7 Fantastic Performances of Children's Poems on YouTube

Poetry is meant to be heard, right? So there's arguably no better place than YouTube to make your poetic discoveries, and there are plenty of performances out there to help you show your pupils how much fun poetry can be. Here are some top renditions of poems for younger children, hand picked by Scottish Book Trust!

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Pupils from New Abbey Primary School at the Waterloo Celebration event

Words for Waterloo: A Collaborative Poem by New Abbey Pupils

Poetry and history collide in one Live Literature-supported project, in which poet Hugh Dryden helped New Abbey Primary School pupils compose a poem to celebrate the Waterloo Monument.

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