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Recent posts – Page 136

  • Cassandra Connolly-Brown: Trick or Read!

    In the modern tradition – I know that’s a bit of an oxymoron – Hallowe'en is about dressing up as a scary monster or your favourite superhero, grabbing a pumpkin-shaped pail or the biggest bag you can find, and knocking on neighbours’ doors in the hopes of bringing home lots of candy. Well, if you’...

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  • NaNoWriMo: Transform Your Shed into A Writing Haven

    When I hear authors speaking about their writing process, the single phrase which excites me is “I write in a shed in the garden”. It sends me off into a dream world of shed design and interior decor. I suspect my problem would be in stopping the dreaming and getting down to the writing but here...

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  • Confessions of a NaNoWriMo Virgin

    November is National Novel Writing Month and Scottish Book Trust will be here to support you with with tips and advice and more great blogs from participants on our writer development programme. One of the former Young Writers Awardees Samantha, tells us about her plans for NaNoWriMo...

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  • Kaimes pupils on Andy Stanton!

    Pupils from Kaimes School decided to write a blog about their experience with the uncommon Andy Stanton, following his Authors Live event! Mrs Verity informed us that our next author would be Andy Stanton. Most of us hadn’t heard of him but we had heard he had written a series of books entitled Mr...

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  • Two steps forward, one step back

    Children collect words and file them away somewhat neatly in their mental lexicon. They take notes of different forms and extract the meaning. Each new word is recorded in the brain and mapped to words that are similar in sound, meaning or structure. Most English verbs follow the rule that adding...

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  • If you can talk, you can sing

    Singing is something we encourage all adults to do with children. Yet for some adults, the thought of singing is scary. People tell horror stories of school, and classes separated into those who could sing, and those who were better listeners. And because of this, people who were discouraged from...

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