Browse Nourish Stories by Keyword

A Better Mood by Food

Victor Temprano

My third day in Edinburgh, and my stomach groaned ferociously as I stepped out of my cheap hostel across from Ryrie’s on Clifton Terrace. I grimaced as my insides shifted and moaned. Hunger only added to the general malaise I already felt, a result of travelling too far too fast with too little purpose. I kept asking myself why I’d come here, what I was hoping to gain from it — and coming up with no good answers.

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A falafel experience

I was on the plane with the rest of the pupils who had signed up for this once in a lifetime trip with school. Eight days in Israel over the February half term. I was excited but also nervous – not a fan of flying and not really knowing that many of the children going. I was almost thirteen and this was a major holiday without my family.

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A is for Apple

George Roy

Act One.

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A Japanese Adventure

Jenny Bloomfield

The other year my boyfriend, Frankie, and I decided to go on a tour of Japan. He had always wanted to go and I'm generally up for visiting anywhere once. When it came to it, everything worked out well and we were both pleased with our choice. We saw temples, statues, and skyscrapers; tried out karaoke (me), sake (Frankie) and kimonos; went to museums, art galleries and parks. The weekend I recall the best, though, was the part of the trip we were most excited about, as this was when we were to meet Mrs Takahashi.

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A Meal to Remember

Alison Dawson

We were a mixed bunch as we spilled out of the little door in the high stone wall surrounding the mediaeval house, our holiday home in this Italian village for the past fortnight. Three couples, seven children, a bachelor brother and two grandmothers made up our complement of sixteen. The age spectrum ranged from grannies to a toddler and English was the common language covering our three nationalities. None of us spoke Italian.

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Keywords: 
travel, European travel

A New Start

Fiona MacLeod

Alex had long nourished the dream of moving to a Scottish Island. This dream was now a reality. His belongings were packed into a transit van, parked on the car deck of the Cal-Mac ferry.

Standing on the deck, he looked out towards Vatersay. He knew it won’t be too long till the ferry docked. The Castle in the Bay, a clan MacNeil’s holding, looked bleak, as the dark clouds gathered overhead. Driving off the car deck he waved at a familiar face.

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Keywords: 
scotland, travel, home

A Picnic Triptych (on a twelve day pony trip)

Leonie Charlton

Day Four – Kintail to Kinloch Hourn

Suardalan Bothy, with its Rowan tree for shade and its enclosed field, is a perfect place to stop for lunch. They’ve been slow, steep miles since dawn-in-Kintail when Shuna and I tacked up the two ponies, their hooves glassy with dew, and the four of us are now famished.

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All Roads Lead to…China!

Mary Contini

Perched on a bench in a hazardous ‘Tuk Tuk’ tricycle we hung on for dear life as a tiny, toothless grandmother pedalled her way through the traffic.  Swerving impudently between fancy limousines and screeching taxis she dodged a red light, took a sharp left turn and stopped abruptly.  Accepting her fare of ten yuan, one pound, she sped off.  Standing at the edge of a busy highway with no idea where we were we felt slightly vulnerable. 

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An Olive Tree is for Life

Margaret Bremner

One of the times in my life when I actually worked the land to produce the food I would later eat was during the two years I spent in Tanzania. We grew sweet potatoes, beans and rice and joined in the prayers of our neighbours that the rain would come in sufficient amounts before the seedlings dried out. There was a real sense of responsibility to each other and the land there. If one family was not cultivating a piece of ground, then another could make use of it. We often worked together and shared the harvest accordingly.

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Apricots and Toffee

Melanie McAinsh, @mmca256

When we emigrated from Glenrothes to Johannesburg in 1970, Dad said there would be orange and banana trees in the street, ripe for picking. It wasn't really like that but the Van der Meer family next door had an apricot tree in their yard and a swimming pool.

Every morning the sun woke me. As I yawned and stretched I could see any changes in the tree. The blossoms came first, the pale papery flowers opening for what seemed only a moment before giving way to hazelnut sized balls which fattened and developed an embarrassed blush of orange.

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